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A struggling venture turns around

Just prior to enrolling in AMI’s Grow Your Business programme, Margaret Mugala was facing a serious crisis. Her business, Dimples Restaurant and Lounge in Nairobi, was struggling, and she owed $30,000 to the bank. “I was actually at the verge of collapse,” she admits.

Then Margaret joined a six-month GYB programme offered through KCB Bank’s Biashara Club for entrepreneurs. Through the programme’s in-person workshops, peer support groups, and online library of courses and tools, Margaret learned practical skills on negotiating, budgeting, and capturing money transactions. Within weeks, she was using the tools she had gained from the programme to better manage her stock and oversee cash flow.

Grow Your Business Alumna - Margaret Mugala

AMI is more practical than other programmes because they go all the way to the level of showing you how to do it, which is very important. And those tools are tools that you use forever.

Margaret Mugala, business owner

Soon after, Margaret saw sales and revenue increase. “After the programme, the sales had improved, and the controls were in place. So it enabled me to open another branch now,” she says. She hired an additional 32 employees as a result.

“AMI is more practical than other programmes because they go all the way to the level of showing you how to do it, which is very important. And those tools are tools that you use forever,” she explains.

Margaret hopes other business owners like her will participate in the GYB programme. “The Grow Your Business program is a very wonderful program, and I would recommend it to many other people.”


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